posted ago by PatriotsVsCommies ago by PatriotsVsCommies +8 / -0

Am I able to take the SIM card out of my current daily driver which is on Verizon's network, put it into a brand new Pinephone, and begin using it to make calls, text, etc. immediately?

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tentonbudgie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Especially using Tracfone or Total Wireless, that would close the deal for me, I would buy one immediately

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Dominion4UsAll 1 point ago +1 / -0

As long as the phone covers the CDMA/4G/5G bands Verizon uses you should be good to go. You'll probably have to call them to update the IMEI associated with the SIM. You potentially may need a new SIM depending on what type of card it uses(mini, micro, etc).

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tentonbudgie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Both CDMA and GSM are multiple-access technologies, meaning they allow multiple calls or data connections on one radio channel. GSM transforms calls into digital data, gives them a shared channel and a time slot and puts the pieces of each call back together for the listener on the other end. CDMA encodes each call’s data with a unique key. Then all calls are transmitted at once, with receivers “dividing” the combined signal back into individual calls.

Of the two, GSM is more widely used around the globe, with availability in more than 200 countries. While CDMA is used widely in the U.S., it is less common elsewhere — most estimates pin the portion of global wireless networks using CDMA at less than 20 percent. The Verizon network is a CDMA wireless network. What does the CDMA/GSM difference mean?

One major distinction between GSM networks and CDMA networks is that the former allows you to make voice calls and transmit data at the same time, while the latter does not. But there’s a catch. How a phone band affects your phone choice

GSM and CDMA standards apply to 2G and 3G connectivity. Carriers all began switching to LTE in 2010, and LTE does support simultaneous voice and data use. Moreover, because LTE is a global standard for 4G networks, Verizon and all other carriers have made the switch, regardless of whether their 2G and 3G connectivity was supported by GSM or CDMA networks.

The distinction is becoming less important and will be entirely irrelevant sooner rather than later (more on that below). At the moment, however, 2G and 3G networks continue to serve as a backup for areas where 4G LTE coverage is weak. And, until recently, many phones used LTE for data only and relied on GSM or CDMA for voice and texts.

For day-to-day use, the distinction between GSM and CDMA is not likely to be a big issue. Today’s CDMA phones work on GSM networks, which is why you’re able to use your Verizon phone when traveling to places that rely on GSM, such as Europe and Asia.

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Dominion4UsAll 1 point ago +1 / -0

Use some quotations next time so you aren't plagiarizing lol..