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posted ago by namenottaken ago by namenottaken +14 / -0

There are a lot of platforms to choose from. Does anyone have any recommendations? I've never installed an OS on a computer before, so any advice on that would be appreciated.

Comments (20)
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deleted 3 points ago +3 / -0
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namenottaken [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

Yeah, I've been trying out a few using a virtual machine, like another comment suggested. Mint xfce has been the nicest so far, so I think I'm going to go with it.

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ChickenInspector 1 point ago +1 / -0

Manjaro is an easier Arch linux, too.

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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ChickenInspector 1 point ago +1 / -0

Manjaro doesn't require the usage of command line.

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itsdangerous 2 points ago +2 / -0

depends if you want to learn or just install a new os. checkout distrowatch. if you want to learn check arch. if you dont want to bother too much ubuntu

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rosie 2 points ago +2 / -0

I chose Debian, and I have not been sorry. If you have apps that you HAVE to have that will run only under Windows, consider either a dual-boot setup (you pick which OS to boot to each time) or run Windows apps in an Oracle VirtualBox virtual machine under Linux. I've also run Linux Mint, which is another great choice for beginners. For the love of God and all that's holy, if you are new to Linux, DO NOT choose Arch!!

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BillboDickens 2 points ago +2 / -0

I've used Debian and Ubuntu versions. I prefer Debian but it requires more of you and is less user-friendly than Ubuntu.

Since you've never done an OS install before, I'm assuming you don't want to mess too much configuration or terminal usage, so I would recommend Ubuntu.

Forewarning, Linux is not Windows and takes getting used to, understanding permissions, navigation, and setup for things Windows does automatically (like device and audio setup)

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ChickenInspector 1 point ago +1 / -0

Make sure that you somehow save the information you would before installing it to the hard drive. Also look into hard drive partitioning so that you don't have to have the entire hard drive on one partition, e.g. the entire hard drive as one partition.

You can have / as one 100 gig partition and the rest in /home, for example. This way you can change distros without overwriting your user files.

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namenottaken [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

I'm putting all of the files I want to keep on a USB stick. I'm not worried about overwriting the current system. One of the main reasons I want to switch to Linux is to get rid of the spyware and bloatware that comes with Windows.

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ChickenInspector 2 points ago +2 / -0

Yeah, once you save the files you're free to wipe the hard drive. It would be a good idea to have multiple partitions set up during the Linux installation though, but it's not required.

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Krauter 1 point ago +1 / -0

Make use of life-CD‘s or thumbdrives. It allows you experience different distros without having to install it. It is also a good way to check, whether any parts of your hardware do not work with the distro. Once you like a distro, you cam them install it directly from the life-CD. Personally, I would recommend Linux Mint. Quite user friendly and similar to Windows (in a not shitty way).

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tentonbudgie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Mint

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BigBrassBowls 1 point ago +1 / -0

I recommend checking out DistroTube

https://odysee.com/@DistroTube:2

He has some good videos that can give you an overview on whatever Linux distribution you choose. Eg: he recently did an overview of Fedora 34.

Installing is pretty easy especially if you aren’t keeping anything on your existing hard drive. If you want multiple partitions that can get tricky. Plenty of tutorials out there.

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Jackyboi123 1 point ago +1 / -0

Get ubuntu unity. Ubuntu unity for life

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deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
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ChickenInspector 1 point ago +1 / -0

Manjaro is my recommendation: the power of Arch linux made more newbie-friendly and access to Arch's AUR community repository.

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tiwal 1 point ago +1 / -0

You can try a virtual box first to see if you like it.

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Gans 1 point ago +1 / -0

Make sure your hardware will take to it first. Test drive a few runs booting from a live usb. Some laptops dont seem to like it. My hp for instance had constant boot failures and resolution issues dunno why. Never had that on any other pc. If it does work great! I personally like Garuda linux and Pop!_OS. All linux is just linux though best way to find a distro is to consider what you use youre pc for and get one that comes with programs you'd likely use. Also make sure it's supported there's alot of forks that have been basically abandoned.

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tentonbudgie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Something that was important to me in going to Linux was deciding not to master everything, but to be a user. I work around minor issues and try to avoid spending huge amounts of time on something just because I find it annoying or whatever, just use it to get my work done and move on. Mint has been good for me. I installed it, set up the accounts, installed a little software, and now I can use it for work. It's fairly stable, it does bonk out on me once in a while, but I just reboot and it rescues my files, and I'm back. There's more to linux than what I do, but what was most important to me was to get my internet browsing off windows and use a raspberry pi router and VPN to get some privacy.