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posted ago by BasedTemplar ago by BasedTemplar +11 / -0

I'm leaning towards muay thai.

I have muscular legs so I figured the best martial art to learn for my body type would be something with a lot of kicks like kickboxing, taekwando, or muay thai.

I have no fighting experience to speak of and have never punched anyone seriously in my life. So if I DID start doing muay thai classes I'd be completely green.

I am, however, athletic and I played soccer for 2-3 years in a small semi-competitive league and basketball for about 5 years in both school and AAU.

My major worry is the schedule+bone conditioning. I've heard that pros train twice a day for 6 days out of the week. Obviously, this is not for me as I wish to casually learn and spar but have no desire to compete professionally. This makes me wonder what a training schedule looks like for a normal person. I have a job+classes to worry about.

Also, I've heard that conditioning your shins is a particularly brutal part of muay thai training. My shins got beat up in both basketball and soccer, but I doubt I'm at the level of toughness needed for muay thai. This worries me somewhat because I don't want to have to skip work or classes because of injuries, and I'm worried about bone deformation. I think I'll be ok if I'm careful and focus on form rather than power first, but it would be helpful to hear some first hand experiences from my fellow pedes.

I do plan on doing preliminary training before joining a gym for about 1-4 months, just to get back in shape and build some more upper body/core muscle. I've been considering doing some variation of this workout(https://betterme.world/articles/one-punch-man-workout/) for a while now(start slow then build up to the full workout).

Has anyone here had martial arts experience muay thai or otherwise? If so, what was your experience?

Comments (20)
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FrontTowardLeft 3 points ago +3 / -0

I've studied martial arts for over 25 years and IMO facing someone who is proficient in muay thai is one of the biggest challenges out there.

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BasedTemplar [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

That's one of the reasons I'm interested in it. It seems to be the single most effective(in real life) martial art besides boxing.

I like that it's full body as well, there's a reason it's called "the art of 8 limbs".

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ChadFuckingThunder 2 points ago +2 / -0

Muay thai is the best place to start imo.

After a year or two I would recommend to add/switch to MMA to learn a bit of grappling to go with it.

It's hard to start with MMA because of slow(er) progression. In MMA you have a day for sticking, day for wrestling and a day for BJJ, assuming you're going 3 days a week which makes progress much slower than if you dedicate to one martial art.

Also, I don't think you have to do preliminary training. Just pick a gym, show up regularly, give it your current best and you'll be in great shape in no time.

I have 6+ years of experiance training martial arts. Started with boxing, transitioned to MMA. It's a lot of fun, you're gonna love it.

If you have any questions just ask.

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Texan1stAmerican2nd 2 points ago +2 / -0

Jui Jujitsu is excellent for all levels. Muay Tai is also a very respectable art. Avoid tae kwon do and karate. Most of the mainstream martial arts are taught for point competition and dont actually teach great fighting tactics. Lopm for an MMA gym. Those guys will wanna see you become a weapon.

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Kolob 2 points ago +2 / -0

Visit studios and do their free/cheap intro package to see if you like them. It is more important to have good instruction than which art you choose. Hapkido is another good one for practical application. You can go to multiple studios that claim to teach an art, but some will be bogus. One of the other commenters mentioned mellowed down Krav Maga

This YouTube channel makes fun of bogus martial arts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CGMWlXosp4

If you run across someone as arrogant as Master Ken, they won't be good at their art. The really legit martial artists I have known were super mellow and calm. The people who are the best don't need to prove themselves. Also those videos are hilarious.

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BasedTemplar [S] 2 points ago +3 / -1

Yea that's one of the things that's been popping up in my research. Fake martial arts/ineffective martial arts seem to be really common.

Thx pede.

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Kolob 2 points ago +2 / -0

My kids studied Hapkido at Bong Soo Han's school in Santa Monica. He had cancer at the time (died while we lived there, we were at the funeral) and we would see him walking in our neighborhood with perfect posture and calm although he had advanced cancer. He taught combat troops in Vietnam and lived through the Korean War, but was a smallish, thin, Asian man. He was the stunt director and the double for this scene in a horrible movie.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEsOmQ8sfvU Every year the college basketball coaches would have Bong Soo Han come in and do motivational demos, he would pick the largest of them all and have them on the floor in seconds.

My borther-in-law was the first disciple of Sifu Kwan Wing Lam. Sifu was not much taller than I am, about 5'2'. Once again he could land anyone and was the most unassuming person you could ever imagine. He was from Hong Kong and very highly respected.

There are legit schools run by caucasians, but you need to ask them their lineage and if they have not studied under good people or tell you they have their own style that takes the best of everything and is superior to everyone, you know they are hucksters. Good martial artists respect other good arts.

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ChadFuckingThunder 1 point ago +1 / -0

I would always recommend a sport over martial art. If there is no competition and sparring how do you know the techniques work?

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Kolob 3 points ago +3 / -0

All martial arts studios I have been aware of do sparring. You are right, otherwise you have no idea if the techniques will work. We wore full padded gear and it is great fun.

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ChadFuckingThunder 1 point ago +1 / -0

I was thinking of martial arts like aikido, ninjutsu etc. There is no sparring there, just choreography without any resistance, unlike sports like box, muau thai, bjj, etc.

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Kolob 1 point ago +1 / -0

I have never heard of that. I know people who practice Aikido and spar, I can't speak for the rest. Maybe it is just those specific studios.

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ChadFuckingThunder 1 point ago +1 / -0

I don't want to sound rude, but drilling a technique is not the same as sparing.

If they do spar that would be the first Aikido school that allows sparing I've heard of.

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Kolob 2 points ago +2 / -0

I am fully aware of what sparring is

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ChadFuckingThunder 1 point ago +1 / -0

No offense

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NotInFormation 2 points ago +2 / -0

Regardless of style -- in the end a punch is a punch, a kick is a kick, and all style converge in the end -- the quality of the instructor is a big influencer of what you'll get out.

Be wary of people looking to tie you into a contract but I have encountered good people teaching in their own practices (and therefore trying to live, so $), in churches and Ys, or hardly recruiting new people at all except by reference.

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AboriginalIvory 2 points ago +2 / -0

Sambo, Krav Maga, Muay Thai, Kyuk To Ki, Kickboxing.

I would avoid most ground type unless competing. Cause its hit and run in real life and you really don't want to go to the ground in a street fight.

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BasedTemplar [S] 0 points ago +1 / -1

Good point. Especially if the person could have a weapon.

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AboriginalIvory 2 points ago +2 / -0

That and you are on the ground.

Harder to escape

Can be easily also cornered by other threats

Plus it hurts going to ground. Its not a soft mat you are most likely to get seriously injured.

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swifty123456 0 points ago +2 / -2

just do krav maga! REAL KRAV MAGA! not the ameircna version try the IKMF or KMG most others are watered down

AND TAKE ON BOXING TO GET USED TO BEING HIT

muya thai is for the gays

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Kolob 1 point ago +1 / -0

AmeriDoTe is the only real martial art