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posted ago by TeaMug71 ago by TeaMug71 +13 / -0

I was wondering, today, if anyone has ever put a big tent over their house...like a big circus tent? It would HAVE to have a substantial impact on your electric bill in the summer. Any ideas on methods and materials?

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ChickNorris 6 points ago +6 / -0

When I was growing up I lived in a pretty dilapidated house in the country with no AC and a tin roof. We had water hoses with tiny holes poked in them thrown across the top of the roof and would run the cold water in the summer to try to cool the house down. Since we had a well this didn't cost us anything extra.

It also didn't really help since the water pretty much turned to steam on those 90 degree days but this was an idiots idea so...

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deleted 1 point ago +2 / -1
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YouNeedVPN 1 point ago +1 / -0

Evaporative cooling pretty decent actually. All that energy to evaporate the water is heat energy extracted from the roof. Not precisely cooling the house, but preventing it from absorbing heat.

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deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
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rubberbiscuit 1 point ago +1 / -0

If I remember basic science though, if water turns to steam it is using up a shit ton of energy in doing so, which should have pulled heat off the home into the atmosphere. This seems like a pretty smart way to cool a house for next to nothing.

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ChickNorris 2 points ago +2 / -0

It didn't work. :- | Nothing helps when it's 90-100 degrees with 60% humidity. It's just swampy arse hot and the only thing you can do is sit in a tub of cold water to cool off.

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Trilby 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yes, the tub of cold water! A cold bath can keep you cool for hours!

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IdahoMan87 5 points ago +5 / -0

That would heat the house even more, because it’ll trap heat. What you’d want would be shade over the house with open sides, so a simple canopy would work much better. There’s other tricks that are more feasible though. Steel roofing painted white will reflect heat. Same with the exterior walls, paint them white to reflect. Add crawl space ventilation to the top peak of your house, even better with a blower fan. Move furniture away from the walls, at least 6”. That will allow better air circulation inside. Plant trees on the southern side of your house. I prefer trees just tall enough to shade the wall, so they don’t pose a threat to the house in windstorms. Keeping your lawn green will also help, but the cost of watering isn’t worth it.

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King6of6the6retards 1 point ago +1 / -0

Worked and lived in a balloon frame and plywood shack in Iraq. We had a couple ACs, but they couldn't keep up (no insulation or inner walls.) I rigged up some frames on the roof, scrounged all the camo netting I could find, and covered the place.

It helped, being in the shade, but outside air temperature is the mind killer.

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TeaMug71 [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Good ideas

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Chosimbaone 3 points ago +3 / -0

Probably a shit post, and good on you for that. However if you don't want let your memes be dreams call a termite company, that do that shit all the time

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Assassin47 3 points ago +3 / -0

Isn't that what they do when they do a super fumigation for insects? At least in the movies.

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TeaMug71 [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was thinking of just a canopy, not sides. I guess a circus tent wouldn’t be a good example 😆

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saltymainahkracken 2 points ago +2 / -0

We use shade cloth all the time in greenhouse applications. You'd likely want reflective shade cloth, not black knitted. You can go to even 60% shade. https://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/ProductDisplay?mfPartNumber=SHADE40R

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TeaMug71 [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

That sounds like it would work. Now, just have to build the super structure and attach it all together. Sounds like it’s going to be expensive. I wish I lots of time and money.

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saltymainahkracken 2 points ago +2 / -0

Well, there's also a paint greenhouses use on poly film to reflect light and heat. It eventually wears off, is biodegradable, etc. You could build a frame, maybe, cover it with the cheapest poly film you can find, paint the poly so it reflects heat/sunlight, and maybe rig up something so the frame can be moved with the sun? Or maybe the paint will stick to something more durable, like a tarp, metal or that plastic roofing(is it polycarbonate?) I have no idea how tall/big your house is, of course, or even if my idea would work. Do you have a local greenhouse? They order all their coverings wholesale from the supply companies, like we do where I work. Mom and pop seasonal greenhouses know how to get the best deal because in our business, we pay for everything for the coming season up front then have to sell our product to make that $$ back and a profit. Might be beneficial to stop in to your local greenhouse and have a chat. :-) We recovered our big house last fall, 2 sheets of poly 100'x80', and gave away the old coverings. I got one, cut in 3 pieces for mine and two friends' home greenhouses. we give away stuff like that all the time.

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CoreyAnder 2 points ago +2 / -0

Just do a huge sun shade. The sides would restrict air flow and also keep the heat in.

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ChiliPowder 2 points ago +2 / -0

Ohhh! I remember reading about a house they've wrapped in a giant greenhouse https://www.ecowatch.com/couple-builds-greenhouse-around-home-to-grow-food-and-keep-warm-1882128131.html

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TeaMug71 [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Well, I was thinking about shade in the summertime. Hadn’t thought about living inside a greenhouse.

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YouNeedVPN 1 point ago +1 / -0

The key is air flow. Get it up a bit to eliminate heating stagnant air.

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FlyinHeadlock 1 point ago +1 / -0

Tents gets hot and traps air. Need air flow. Preferrated roof underhang...whatever it's called and a vented roof. This allows hot air to move up and out and keeps the cooler air at the bottom near the ceiling and sides of the house. Homebuilders, even today are ignorant by and large on how this process works to keep the home cooler. They want to foam and lay more insulation down which traps heat.

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ThebigLMAOski17 1 point ago +1 / -0

so lets define the environment we're trying to achieve here. OP is asking if there is a way to make that work... here's how it could be done.

take an insulated home, wrap it in an envelope... in this case lets use a glass greenhouse.

extend all the house vents to the outside of the greenhouse, all fresh air intake, everything... but the rest of the house is normal.

now you've essentially created a dead air space "coat" around your house.

no more wind and rain, no more quick temp changes during day and night cycles

...now install temp activated hydraulic openers/closers on the upper vent windows of the greenhouse. you can regulate the interior temp that way just using the stack effect.

fresh air intake/makeup air via buried ventilation tubes that would cool the outside air on the way into the greenhouse during the hottest part of the day.

even better if you can use some active ventilation and heat exchangers to control both main zones.

frankly it would be a home automation nerd's dream getting to teach their home how to breathe and self regulate like a living machine.

the house inside would last much longer, cheaper to heat in the winter, probably cheaper to cool in the summer once you've got that differential established in the dead air space.

...where do i sign up for this and who wants to clean all my glass once a week?

EDIT:

nothing new apparently: Family wraps home in greenhouse to warm up Stockholm weather https://youtu.be/30ghnDOFbNQ

Nordic home encased within geodesic dome for passive solar https://youtu.be/1Bn2o-xyS6M

Glass Dome Eco House In The Arctic Circle https://youtu.be/lc_clnBY-2I

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Dale_Gribble 1 point ago +1 / -0

funny my name is what it is here. You can get large tents and do that yes. I think they have been used for fumigation with large insect populations living in houses and they need to kill everything.

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WashingtonIsNext 1 point ago +1 / -0

Why not shade trees?

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TeaMug71 [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

I would love to have some big trees all around the house but don’t want to pick up sticks, clean gutters or worry about a tree falling on the house everytime there is a storm. What I had pictured in my mind was a big white canopy over the house. Was curious if anyone had ever done it and what the results were.