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posted ago by happybillmoney ago by happybillmoney +87 / -0

Hello fellow consumers,

As always thank you to everyone that participated in the last weekly and remember you are Operation MONKE!

u/BigBeef, u/OrganicMolecules, u/ThrowawayRV, u/saltyrainbow, u/TheRealPizzaPope, u/BigPedeEnergy, u/DaLaohu, u/ModsBanPaleos, u/Harambe, u/GeorgeFentanylFloyd, u/big_boner, u/crash7863, u/solarlux, u/weizkangz, u/hog_hunter, u/SoAngryRanger, u/Blursed2021, u/Happyarch, u/mp40, u/AlmostBased, u/Tourgen, u/SuburbanYute


This Weeks Discussion Theme: Based Books

As some of you remember we use to do book club but have stopped due to low enthusiasm. Regardless some of us are book worms and this weekly is for all the readers here with a focus on the idea of based books. Discussion ideas:

  • What’s the most recent based book you’ve read?
  • Are there based books you have been meaning to read?
  • What are some based books you would recommend reading?

Weekly Polls:


Previous Weeklies:

Comments (111)
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deleted 50 points ago +52 / -2
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tycho 3 points ago +3 / -0

This. It's the number one podcast on iTunes, and for good reason. I listen to it nearly every day, and I've gotta say, its good.

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Blursed2021 4 points ago +4 / -0

Yes, because some random on the internet will know better than the Pilgrim Fathers.

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Call_Me_Kaiser 22 points ago +24 / -2

Industrial society and it's future

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LovecraftCat 7 points ago +7 / -0

Dauntless by Marcus Follin

The best anti-cooming hackbook: https://easypeasymethod.org/

Mein Kampf explains how media can manipulate people and create a big lie. Adolf also talks about the controlled opposition and passive politicians.

Lovecraft has some entertaining works, if you are into horror.

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illustrious_forever 22 points ago +23 / -1

I’ve heard a lot of people talk about how they don’t like “Juden Peterstein,” but for once it appears to me the left has something going for them with their “alt-right pipeline” theory. Peterson was my first step towards getting redpilled, and I feel like his 12 Rules for Life would be a good intro for normie friends who feel their life doesn’t have much direction. Granted, I didn’t read it and turn into the Übermensch but is that a realistic expectation for any book? I believe the emphasis he puts on the pursuit of truth as opposed to hedonism and consumerism will put a lot of people on a good path.

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ImperialTeddy 12 points ago +12 / -0

Agreed. Definitely recommend 12 Rules For Life, normie-friendly and slightly based.

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illustrious_forever 4 points ago +4 / -0

Exactly!

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KirbyMorph 18 points ago +19 / -1

Recommendations

Herodotus - Histories
Strabo - The Geography
Diodorus Siculus - The Library of History
Justinus - Epitome of Pompeius Trogus' "Philippic histories"
Thucydides - The History of the Peloponnesian War
Josephus - Jewish Wars, Antiquities of the Jews
Tacitus - Germania
Julius Caesar - The Gallic Wars
Jordanes - Getica
Isidore of Seville - History of the Goths, Vandals and Suevi
Procopius - The Secret History
Herwig Wolfram - History of the Goths
Geoffrey of Monmouth - History of the Kings of Britain
Nennius - History of the Britons
Bede - An Ecclesiastical History of the English People
Snorri Sturluson - Prose Edda
Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
Plato - The Republic, Timaeus
Plotinus - The Enneads
Sun Tzu - The Art of War
Donnelly, Ignatius - Atlantis, The Antediluvian World
Laurence Austine Waddell
Madison Grant - The Passing of the Great Race
Albion's Seed - David Hackett Fischer
Bulfinch's Mythology
The Bhagavad Gita
Emerson - Nature
Alfred Rosenberg - The Myth of the 20th Century
C.S. Lewis - The Abolition of Man
Roger Scruton - Beauty
Patton - The Patton Papers
Goethe - Faust
Knut Hamsun - Hunger
Robert Graves - I, Claudius
Dostoevsky - The Brothers Karamazov
The Grimm brothers - Grimm Fairy Tales
Thomas William Shore - Origin of the Anglo-Saxon Race
Joseph Pomeroy Widney - Race Life of the Aryan Peoples
JB Bury - The Invasion of Europe by the Barbarians
Oera Linda Book

By no means an exhaustive list, but I think this would form a proper basis for addressing history, philosophy, and everything in between. You can pick almost anything from this list and find something youll never regret having read or invested your time on. Penguin does abridged versions of some texts in their cheap versions or weaker translations, but can be found for low cost or used. Many are out of copyright and can be found for free online. If you are a collector, Canterbury Classics makes leatherbound versions of many of these that are excellent quality with large font and thicker paper that are a joy to read and have on display. Their philosophy book collects most of the Greeks, for instance. Bulfinch's Mythology is in a similar leatherbound version from Barnes and Noble I believe.

I also recommend Oera Linda Book. Many will never have heard of or read it.

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GeorgeFloydSchnozzle 6 points ago +6 / -0

Hamsun's Hunger is so fucking good.

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tycho 6 points ago +6 / -0

I just downloaded it based on your recommendation and WOW. Dude, thank you for commenting!

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GeorgeFloydSchnozzle 5 points ago +5 / -0

I appreciate the reply man, I'm glad you liked it. I would also recommend Growth of the Soil by him, too. In fact, I think it should be the official book of ConsumeProduct alongside the Unabomber Manifesto.

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Fabius 1 point ago +1 / -0

A fellow Herodotus fan.

Awesome. That's one best books I've ever read. So amazing.

I wasn't a fan of the Gallic Wars, but still interesting. I'm going to save this post and read some of the ones I haven't yet. What would you suggest?

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KirbyMorph 1 point ago +1 / -0

If you enjoyed Herodotus, I would pick up the Geographies and Library of History. They are excellent sources of historical context similar to Histories.

https://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Strabo/home.html
https://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Diodorus_Siculus/home.html

Links to both if you want to look at them first or just read them digitally. If you arent looking for historical accounts like this, Oera Linda is my absolute recommendation.

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/40986/40986-h/40986-h.htm

Also, the poetic Edda, while not listed, is another beautiful text many people never read or hear about.

http://www.heathengods.com/library/poetic_edda/ThorpeEdda.pdf

As Herodotus was mentioned, I think the first two are more in line with that. The other two are personal favourites of mine though. You can sample most all books listed as free pdfs with a quick search.

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MGTAU 3 points ago +3 / -0

First point is good, you don't have to mock him though.

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TheWestYearZero -2 points ago +2 / -4

I would kill myself before i tried to read a boring pile of shit like that.

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Fabius 4 points ago +4 / -0

And this is why you'll forever remain a mouth*breathing dipshit.

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BasedRoach 13 points ago +13 / -0

I'm reading Meditations right now.

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BasedRoach 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yes of course.

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ValuesLiberty 13 points ago +13 / -0

RAISING MEAT GOATS IN A COMMERCIAL OPERATION

Written by a good christian Goat Farmer in the Mid-west...

https://www.grandviewlivestock.com/book.htm

His Blog is good too: https://grandviewlivestock.com/devotionals/

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SubtleTea 11 points ago +11 / -0

Just started reading Revolt Against the Modern World. I used to read a whole lot of Taoist books when I was younger, so it was a nice surprise for Taoism to have been mentioned in the first chapter. Interesting read thus far.

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hog_hunter 2 points ago +2 / -0

The Bow and the Club, also by Evola, is another good book. It's a series of essays, and is a little easier to get into.

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SubtleTea 3 points ago +3 / -0

There are literally hundreds of Taoist books. Tao te Ching is just the famous one everybody knows.

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SubtleTea 3 points ago +3 / -0

Completely different. Tao te Ching isn't any more or less authoritative than many of the others. It's not THE Taoist book. It's just the most famous one.

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SubtleTea 3 points ago +3 / -0

Taoism is just a name that was given to something which already existed. There were immortal masters far earlier than Lau, there were immortals far later than him. Saying any of them is more or less important shows a fundamental misunderstanding of what Taoism is about. You're stuck on the outer trappings and have missed it's essence.

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TheWestYearZero 1 point ago +1 / -0

The Parker books by Ricgard Stark

https://en.id1lib.org/book/1673343/76e8ff

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Fabius 1 point ago +1 / -0

I only made it about half-way through Brave New World. The plot lost me about half way through, but the premise was interesting.

By Ford!

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RunningBuffalo 7 points ago +7 / -0

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris is a fantastic read.

A skinny, asthmatic boy makes himself into the most dynamic human being in the most dynamic country on earth. Along the way he works as a backwoods lumberjack in Maine, as a rancher in the Dakotas, and as police commissioner of New York City.

One time, some sketchy dudes stole one of Teddy's boats in the middle of the night in the middle of winter. He hopped in another boat, caught up to the thieves, held them at gunpoint, and brought them all back in during a snowstorm by himself. It took three days. He didn't sleep. To keep himself awake, he read epic poetry.

And then of course there's the time that he volunteered to lead a regiment consisting of a bunch of his old cowboy buddies to Cuba during the Spanish-American War and led the famous charge up San Juan Hill under enemy fire.

TR read a book a day on average. He barely drank alcohol. While in college, in his free time he wrote a book on the naval history of the War of 1812. It became the definitive work on the subject for a century. He lifted weights. He boxed. He raised animals. Via his zest for life, he got more visceral human experience than I could in ten lifetimes.

There's tragedy, too. He lost his mother and his first wife just hours apart. His brother was a layabout alcoholic his entire life. His cattle ranch failed.

The book stops before he even makes it to the White House. (There is a sequel that covers his Presidency and one that covers his post-Presidency. Both are also stellar, but neither are quite as good as the first book.)

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glownigger1488 6 points ago +6 / -0

i like some of the classic dystopia novels. 1984 and brave new world helped redpill me when i was younger on some of the bad directions humanity could be headed towards. nowadays though you can just look outside and modern society is more absurd than either.

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bangbus 6 points ago +6 / -0

It’s because like 89% of English teachers say Republicans are Big Brother and convince the vast majority of their automatons, err students, that they are virtuous soldiers against totalitarianism by supporting the DNC.

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subbookkeeper 4 points ago +4 / -0

The key word is force, it's just an assignment so it has no bearing to the real world.

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MGTAU 2 points ago +2 / -0

Absurd you say? Have you read Camus? I like The Plague, then try The Fall

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muh_products 6 points ago +6 / -0

Started reading Essays and Aphorisms by Arthur Schopenhauer. The chapter on women is quite interesting, and echoes a lot of what is said around these parts. I've tried reading Ethics by Aristotle but it was really heavy reading; also read about 1/3 of Ted's Industrial Society and Its Future though that I found quite repetitive, effectively boiling down to "invention of x leads to y which ultimately has a net negative on society".

Oera Linda is on the reading list thanks to Asha Logos excellent series.

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Blursed2021 5 points ago +5 / -0

I've been reading Nathan Bedford Forrest by Jack Hurst. Biographies are great to read because you get to see how great men lived their lives. It isn't theory but actual practice of ideals.

Forrest is the quintessential Gaelic southern warrior. He's someone I would have followed to hell.

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DaLaohu 2 points ago +2 / -0

But, did you know, he was racist?

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Blursed2021 4 points ago +4 / -0

It was his superpower

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DaLaohu 5 points ago +5 / -0

I highly recommend more of the Right should be "RedPill Aware." That is, learn what women truly are. This is literaly lifesaving advice for men. We've been lied to or everyone is just too unaware. There is a reason it's called "RedPill." It really is seeing reality for the first time. I came into it AFTER finding out about Jews and race and that does not compare to the life shattering change of the Women RedPill.

At this point there are canonical works in the RedPill, but I feel some of the new stuff is more to the point and better. But one RedPill canon I recommend is Pook. If you look at nothing else, read this. I would go as far as to say it's all you need. htpp://www.bookofpook.com

Rich Cooper's YouTube channel and his book, UnPlugged Alpha is great.

http://redpillhandbook.com/ Is another great source.

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ManualGuitar 4 points ago +4 / -0

The Rational Male is also definitely worth reading.

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DaLaohu 5 points ago +5 / -0

Yyyyeeeaaahhh, but he's an awful writer and even his podcasts are rambling. He has no idea how to Bottom Line Up Front to the point that I wonder how he got so succesful. Those books (save for the fourth which is also awful) are collections of blogposts and break every writing convention there is. They often start with a reader comment in it's unedited entirety. His reply to it hemming and hawing and marveling over how he can think. 3/4 of the way down he gets to his topic and abruptly ends on an unrelated matter. The blog posts are then full of him restating blue-pill errant conventional wisdom with no indication that he is changing voice or that this is incorrect thinking. Compare that to how Pook restates "common wisdom." Pook uses a dialogue format and signals the reader as the speaker of this incorrect common wisdom with "The Pook" responding to it. Pook is clearly a major in the arts and no stranger to writing.

Rollo has stated that he recently read one book on writing ("Cut the Bullshit") when writing Book 4, but....he should read something better and more classical like "The Elements of Style." I mean, he wrote countless essays and four books going on five and still doesn't know that punctuation should go inside quotation marks at the end of the sentence, save for the question mark. He also often derides readers and listeners for wanting him to be more direct and on-point as "TLDR Generation." No. That's called intelligent writing and speaking. The opening line is your conclusion with the subsequent sentences being support before going back to the conclusion. Not, "A reader commented this: UNEDITED WALL OF TEXT. Normally I ignore these comments, but this has got me to thinking about......(five paragraphs in) POINT; Women have a dual mating strategy where they bang the alphas and expect betas to raise the child...(two paragraphs straying off topic) Maybe someday we'll......(Where's the conclusion?)

That's what I meant when I said we should be moving onto the newer works that are more succinct about the redpill. Reddit posts do a better job of it than Rollo, hence why I linked a book of them. I love the guy, but he's clearly benefiting from being among the first to get this stuff out there (and good marketing).

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ManualGuitar 2 points ago +2 / -0

That's fair. Though I'll admit that I'm a bit biased. Those books were my first introduction to redpill concepts, so it all felt very new and interesting, despite the bloated presentation of it. Perhaps if I'd already known then, what I know now, maybe I wouldn't have such a positive opinion of it. But regardless, I can't bring myself to dislike them.

I'd definitely agree about the Book of Pook though. I certainly appreciate the more streamlined and easily digestible presentation of it. Something that I especially like about it is that it focuses very little on things like "strategies" and "philosophies", and in fact seems to regard them with disdain. Rather, focusing more on putting the reader into the right frame of mind. About sincerely changing your mindset and personality for the better. To stop overthinking everything you do, and to just act. I think that's what people today need the most.

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ttedpill 4 points ago +4 / -0

1)March of the titans 2)The Bible 3)The Republic 4)ISAIF 5)sun and steel *this is in no particular order

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123Yeetgody 4 points ago +4 / -0

I've been meaning to read ride the tiger by evola, but never really had the time to gte around to it.

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Spoonks 4 points ago +4 / -0

Bronze age mindset And Sun and steel

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Nose_noticer_II 4 points ago +5 / -1

Fun, but complete nonsense.

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RichardKimball 3 points ago +3 / -0

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Read this when I was in college, and still come back to it every so often.
It's an autobiographical account by a man making a motorcycle trip across country with his son. He's got a genius level IQ, and taught in college, but had a complete mental breakdown, got committed and received shock therapy.
He's lost the memory of who he was, and the the trip goes through his old stomping grounds from before the break down.
He's trying to figure out the nature of reality, and come up with a definition of quality.
He also spends a lot of time talking about the nuts and bolts of his motorcycle, and people's tendency to skim the surface of things rather than going to the trouble of understanding them. He surmises that people live with the benefits of technology, but because they don't understand it, they also hate it.
When I read it in my twenties, I understood it one way. Reading it in my sixties was very different.

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crash7863 3 points ago +3 / -0

I don't read fiction anymore. The last book I've been reading is the "Honeywell Engineering Manual of Automatic Control". I spend most of my work days reading similar books about electrical theory or HVAC theory. I've got text books from building controls from other manufacturers too. Be it Trane, Siemens, or KMC. It's all logic. It's refreshing to read as none of it is infested with woke bullshit, just logic.

I've also got books on motors and how it all works. The more I learn about this shit, the more valuable I become in the job market.

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crash7863 2 points ago +2 / -0

I should add: heating is never going away. Everybody needs heating and everybody wants to save money on heating their building. Like plumbing, it's a trade that will never go away and will always pay.

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SeproDep 2 points ago +2 / -0

I've been planning on reading And Then There were None. Is that one based? I know it used to be called Ten Little Niggers.

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Aurichalcite 2 points ago +2 / -0

Ten Little Indians* I thought It was called. Based if I'm wrong though. It's a fun read

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clemaneuverers 2 points ago +2 / -0

An advantage of studying [Holocaust Revision] is the small number of essential texts. While there may be quite a few journal articles to peruse, we here cite only the basic, need-to-read books, all available online...

  • Nicholas Kollerstrom, (from his book "Breaking The Spell" which is included on the list)

(All working PDF downloads, unless otherwise stated)














The books of Carlo Mattogno are avaiable here: http://vho.org/dl/ENG.html

for free pdf download. Select from the drop-down menu. They go into more detail than the general reader is likely to require.

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jtpg3 2 points ago +2 / -0

Mein Kampf, the Holy Bible

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DEPORT_DOOMERS 1 point ago +3 / -2

You said the same thing twice

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EthicalEconomist 2 points ago +2 / -0

I’m all about ecoNOOMics, so in that category, I’d recommend:

Basics:

Basic Economics, by Thomas Sowell

Antifragile, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

The Dao of Capital, by Mark Spitznagel

Economics in One Lesson, by Henry Hazlitt

Intermediate:

America’s Great Depression, by Murray Rothbard

Socialism, by Ludwig von Mises

Democracy: The God That Failed, by Hans-Hermann Hoppe, or

The Myth of the Rational Voter, by Bryan Caplan (Hoppe is more redpilled)

Advanced:

Human Action, by Ludwig Von Mises

Knowledge and Decisions, by Thomas Sowell

Man, Economy, and State: with Power and Market, by Murray Rothbard

Capitalism, by George Reisman

Also:

On Liberty, by John Stuart Mills

The Law, by Frederic Bastiat

Lies the Government Told You, by Judge Andrew P. Napolitano

Just about any other book that Thomas Sowell wrote

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Rimeofthemariner 2 points ago +2 / -0

Just look at my bookshelves, kings.

  • The Holy Bible
  • Numerous Evola
  • Faye
  • Linkola
  • Kaczynski
  • Mark Dice

Fiction:

  • C.S. Lewis
  • S.M Anderson
  • Conrad -JL Bourne

I have a lot more, just can't remember and am not home.

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soge 1 point ago +1 / -0

Old comment I know... but +1 for mark dice. I remember reading his conspiracy books and those were my first red pills

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Rimeofthemariner 2 points ago +2 / -0

Just picked up another one of his the other day. Going to give it a read soon.

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subbookkeeper 2 points ago +2 / -0

Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein, my favourite book actually.

Black Rednecks and White liberals by Thomas Sowell, basically an abattoir for sacred cows. (trigger warning for pro Jewish content)

Foolproof by Greg Ip, very subtly based on the ideals of safety v liberty and how rushing for safety doesn't lead to where people think it will lead. Great for understanding unintended consequences.

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CaptainBeefheart5 2 points ago +2 / -0

The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky and Sun and Steel by Mishima are two really based books.

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KasierVonGoguryeo191 2 points ago +2 / -0

Very late to this I know, but Macbeth I think is a good one. Really tells the story of how our fears can drive us to insanity, no one is safe from them, such as a normal man as Macbeth

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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based_biker 2 points ago +2 / -0

Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell

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The_Dank_Astero 2 points ago +2 / -0

Not really a book worm but 1984, Brave New World, The Anarchist’s cookbook, and Industrial Society and its future is possibly worth collecting idk (read them too)

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TheRealPizzaPope 2 points ago +2 / -0

The greatest parody of modern day to ever exist is Jaihoo’s Trip to the Future by Sam Hyde

On a more serious note, Thomas Paine’s stuff is great. I recently read Common Sense and, if you haven’t read his stuff, do so.

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solarlux 2 points ago +2 / -0

In no particular order:

  • Sun Tzu, Art of Warfare. I don't have a recomendation of a translation, I was gifted a lovely hardbound edition that included plates of the original text as recovered, sadly no longer in print.

  • The Bear Went Over the Mountain, and its companion work Other Side of the Mountain.

  • The Persian Expedition and Conversations of Socrates, both by Xenophon.

  • The Final Weapon, Gabe Suarez

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Fabius 1 point ago +1 / -0

Thomas Cleary for Translation on the Art of War.

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cholulaking 1 point ago +1 / -0

Neger, Neger, Schornsteinfeger

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Fabius 1 point ago +1 / -0

Plutarch's Lives.

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thenameisdonald 1 point ago +1 / -0

‘Orthodoxy and the Kingdom of Satan’ by Father Spyridon Bailey.

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RightSideFunding 1 point ago +2 / -1

The Rising Tide of Color Against White World-Supremacy

Lothrop Stoddard

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TedGetTheBomb 1 point ago +1 / -0

ctrl + f spengler

0 results

read Decline of The West

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Slimeball 1 point ago +1 / -0

think im well known user go to AMA page me not their mfw

https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/001/937/655/73c.jpg

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sunshinenationalist 1 point ago +1 / -0

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is something I just recently read, it was amazing!

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Fabius 1 point ago +1 / -0

Democracy in America, Tocqueville

A fantastic look at early America from an outsider's (European French) perspective. Based as fuck when he starts talking about the tripartite nature of race in the U.S. (White, Black, Indian). Highly recommended.

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redguards_are_nwahs 1 point ago +1 / -0

Plato: Complete Works.

I just finished "Sophist", which ended by painting all sophists as opportunistic intellectuals who charge high prices to produce falsehoods under the guise of expertise. Must have had liberal arts colleges back in Ancient Greece too, by the sound of it.

The general structure of each work is interesting to comprehend, as they are presented as Socratic dialogues largely driven by question-asking and answer-giving. Some of them drag on, but that's ok. The one where Socrates derives the etymology of the names of all of the gods can be skipped with no big loss

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solarlux 1 point ago +1 / -0

Another for anyone considering the current political terrain would be Confrontational Politics by H.L. Richardson. Short book but hits pretty good at how traditional polite conservative values get explotied by communists and how to combat this.

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Hoiboi_12 1 point ago +3 / -2

Witcher book series. The books are surprisingly good. My friend recommended this book, I thought book was only hyped because of the game but I was wrong. The games gained popularity because of the books. I think it is the last good mediaeval fantasy book. I haven't played any witcher games yet but I definitely will, if I get my hands on them.

The protagonist, Geralt of rivia is a very likeable character even though his some actions are strange or unjustified. The world of witcher is detailed and side characters are entertaining too. Witcher potrays masculinity and some form of stoic personality.

Witcher (Geralt) lives in a world where witcher are no longer needed and considered as monsters even though they kept humanity safe for a long time. Humans start living with monsters instead of killing them and the witcher no longer get to kill monster for a living. I know this sounds like a consoomer mindset but you can relate a lot of things with witcher as a white man.

This isn't at the level of LOTR or any other legendary fictions but it's definitely worth a read.

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bangbus 1 point ago +1 / -0

One of the most based books ever written is “The Road to Serfdom” by Hayek. He wrote it in the 1940’s. Pretty much everything he said about collectivism is either spot on or has happened.

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TendieMan 1 point ago +1 / -0

Most based book I've read is Industrial society and its future. I've been reading Revolt against the modern world but I can't recommend it because I haven't finished it yet. I'm meaning to read the Decline and fall of the Roman Empire and the Holy Bible.

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Fabius 1 point ago +1 / -0

AESOP'S FABLES

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RightSideFunding 0 points ago +1 / -1

Civilisation, Its Cause and Cure: And Other Essays

Edward Carpenter

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RightSideFunding 0 points ago +1 / -1

2081

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RightSideFunding 0 points ago +1 / -1

2 B O N 2 B

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deleted 0 points ago +1 / -1